The events of August 1917
The first month of the Battle of Passchendaele saw an inevitable increase in the number of dead and wounded with a noticeable number of reports of men struggling with the after effects of gas and shell shock. There are also a number of mentions of men who had been reported missing at the Somme, now confirmed as dead. Unlike the extensive reports of the previous year, many of the notices are somewhat cursory, perhaps as a result of fewer letters from officers at the front, or perhaps a newspaper running on minimum staff. Something of the sorrow experienced by families at home is captured in a moving poem by Emily Denby written on receiving the few last effects of her dead soldier brother. The start of one of the war’s most horrific battles also coincided with the third anniversary of its start and church services were held in which a war-weary public were urged to remember the sacrifice and courage of the soldiers and to show the same resolve to carry on until victory is won. That won’t have been easy with growing hardships and austerity - the need, for example, to register to be allowed to buy sugar - and the newspaper carried an increasing number of household tips and recipes for inexpensive dishes. There was plenty of discussion about the introduction of an Education Bill in parliament which would have an enormous effect in the Shipley District because it banned half-time pupils. And even more heated opinions were exchanged when it was discovered that one group of Bradford League cricket clubs was planning a breakaway. The links here will take you to pages containing stories published exactly 100 years before. The headlines shown are only a taste of the stories that appear on that page.
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3 August 1917
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Looking sad won’t win the war - Carter killed by wool bale - Advice on making summer beverages
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Important reminders from anniversary   - Inspector’s foot crushed   - Glen attraction removed
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Mother’s warning following son’s death - Wife dies while husband visits wounded son - Soldier dies before family can reach him
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10 August 1917
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Sermons to mark third anniversary of war - Some seek profit while others sacrificed - Weariness must not lead to unjust peace
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Firm fined for employing 13 year old boy   - Farmers complain about price of milk   - Record crowds for Priestley Cup semis
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Germans paid for killing my pal - Postcard ends five-months’ anxiety - Pals pay tribute to dead comrade
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17 August 1917
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Education Bill to end half-time workers - Bill is threat to trade in Shipley - Bill is an attack on parents’ rights
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Families must register for sugar supplies   - Committee doing its best on pensions   - Objectors should be doing useful work
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Soldier lucky to survive shell attack - Four sons fighting for king and country - Veteran sailor up for promotion
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- Poem on receiving dead brother’s effects - Vicar to return from the front reluctantly - Bugler describes his training routine