The events of October 1917
With the war well into its fourth year and increasing number of casualties reported week after week, those at home were growing wearier and subject to more and more restrictions. October saw the powers of the Food Controller come increasingly into effect. They helped in clamping down on prices and war profiteering but meant the public had to get used to needing to register for sugar cards or risk going without. There is little doubt that there was a growing number of people calling for peace talks but still the majority view was that the war should continue until the German military had been crushed. A War Aims Committee was formed in Shipley to counter the voices of the ‘peace cranks.’ One of the main talking points was the government’s draft education bill which would end children’s half-time working. For some it represented a massive step forward; for others an intrusion into the rights of parents to have their sons and daughters contribute to the household economy. The plan concerned local businessmen in trades like textiles who were going to be greatly affected by the change. The theme of the fole of women workers continued to be played out. Increasingly it was seen how much they could contribute and there was even talk they could be trusted to run a farm without men! Meanwhile, in France especially, the war raged on. Men died, were wounded, showed heroism, were awarded medals. When you read the stories of the lives that were sacrificed, it is hard not to think what those men might have become had their lives not been ended so prematurely. And the stories that appeared of families who made multiple sacrifices, one wonders how those at home lived with the day to day anxiety of wondering what the news would brin them that day. The links here will take you to pages containing stories published exactly 100 years before. The headlines shown are only a taste of the stories that appear on that page.
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5 October 1917
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Food Committee ready to impose sanctions - Parcels that led to wedding bells - Landlord struggles to prove his age
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Moving towards all-women farms   - The man who brought beagles back   - Display of scientific swimming
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Family dispel traitor rumours - Sailor praised by French general - Three army friends set for reunion
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- Talented musician killed in action - Patriotic Idle family - Killed by direct hit as he slept
12 October 1917
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Pros and cons of ending half-timers - Make union membership easier for women - Fined for underweight tea packages
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Food Committee tackle basic goods   - Why doesn’t God stop the war?   - An expensive treat for everyone
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- ‘Feeding the fishes’ on rough crossing - Death adds to a family’s woes - Big turnout for soldier’s funeral
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19 October 1917
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Traders warned to keep bread prices low - Vicar’s bold question & answer sessions - League opt for the status quo
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Sugar card distribution on track   - Town planning benefits felt soon   - Junction’s golden couple
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Family’s stories highlight war’s anxieties - Promotion in th thick of the fray - M.C. for Baildon officer
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- Shy organist killed doing his duty - Idle Boy Scout KIA - Home from France to be married