Friday 30 March 1917
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With a view to assisting us in our efforts to run a potato-growing competitions – and thus do something towards encouraging and helping local gardeners and others in the home-production of food – the editor of the ‘Smallholder” has very kindly given us permission to
reproduce the above illustration in the Express, the same having previously been published in our useful contemporary. The illustration gives in plain and easily understood form the best way to go about potato growing and we trust it will be found helpful.
One of the key messages being repeated week after week was the need for people to produce more of their own food in order to overcome growing shortages. Mr J E Watmough wrote a long article singing the praises of raising pigeons – known as squabs – as food. These are some extracts: Breeding pigeons for table purposes, both as an industry and a hobby, has been even more neglected in this country than has the breeding of Table Rabbits. There are, of course, a great many people amongst us who breed Table Pigeons and market them on commercial lines as food, but what is done here in that way is as nothing compared with what might be done and which has long been done by overseas breeders. Exhibition or racing And yet strange to say, there are far more pigeon keepers in Britain than in any other country in the world. But most of the birds are kept either for exhibition or racing. As we are now forcibly realising, a great many available sources of food supply have been utterly neglected and certainly one of the is squab-raising as an industry on the American, Canadian and Continental plan. Now that this country is faced with a serious shortage of food, it should make people think as they never thought before and the result may be that the breeding of both Table Pigeons and Table Rabbits, either as a business, a profitable hobby, for home consumption or temporarily to
provide more food for people, will be encouraged and tried. The real big, fat, juicy pigeon squab of a right variety must be at its best and be killed when it is about four-weeks old. It is at that age in the nest and when it is still being fed by its parents its flesh is plentiful, firm but tender and the youngster has not pecked food for itself. Luscious and appetising This is just when the young Table Pigeon is ready for killing. It will not afterwards get any more tender for eating. On the contrary if it is not killed at the right time, it rather depreciates both as to size and quality and it is afterwards nor nearly the luscious and appetising dish it would have been if it had been killed at the proper age. A pigeon squab of the right variety, suitably fed, killed when at its best, and properly cooked, is equal to any food and vastly superior to most in its appetising, nourishing and medicinal properties. Unfortunately, in this country, when one speaks of killing and cooking pigeons – mostly served as pie – one thinks of the common nondescript. I refer to the ancient, under- sized, badly-fed, scraggy, tough apology of a pigeon usually offered for sale! But this is a totally different thing to the pigeon kept, bred, fed, killed, packed and marketed as food by overseas squab farm proprietors whose produce by proper business organisation is regularly to be found in all the best markets, hotels, restaurants, hospitals and homes.
With food shortages increasing why not replace the scraggy pigeon with a tasty squab?
“A pigeon squab of the right variety, suitably fed, killed when at its best, and properly cooked, is equal to any food and vastly superior to most in its appetising, nourishing and medicinal properties.”
The allotments for food production so generously provided by Mr S Tattersall at Shipley Glen, were formerly inaugur- ated recently by that gentleman cutting the first sod. The allotments comprise an area of 10,400 square yards and this is divided into portions of 500 square yards. The condition is that the allotments are to be used for food producing plants only. Market value The allotments are free of tenure and all produce over and above home requirements has to be sold at a market value. All money derived from the sale is to be from time to time distributed to some charitable object or fund for the benefit of wounded soldiers or sailors created in the Shipley or Bradford areas. The president of the Shipley Glen ratepayers’ Association, Mr Dalby, called upon Mr Tattersall to cut the first sod, remarking on the good fellowship that existed amongst its members and their ever-ready response to assist any scheme. national or local when there were called upon.
New allotments opened at Shipley Glen
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