Friday 25 May 1917
Home Page Home Page Home Page Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page
Available at all Chemists, Stores etc and from C B Fulford Ltd., Leeds.
Why not let your skin be made beautiful while you sleep? All you have to do last thing at night is to gently massage the cheeks, lips, chin and neck with a little Ven- Yusa on the tip of your first two fingers. When Ven-Yusa is used in this way, the skin receives an oxygen bath which opens and cleanses the pores, imparts new vitality to the tissues and drives away that tired look that may soon develop into permanent ageing lines. Used last thing at night and made part of one’s morning toilet, Ven-Yusa is a veritable boon to the fair sex in these days of anxiety and over- work.
By the passing of James Dibb the Shipley district and especially the ranks of Oddfellowship and the friendly society movement, have lost one of its most honoured and sincere workers. He was of a most unassuming and retiring disposition and never sought the limelight of publicity. All the offices he held – and they were numerous – were attended to regularly, punctually and with that quiet dignity which generally accompanies efficiency and transparent honesty. All the offices were thrust upon him rather than sought for; his ambition was for usefulness and opportunity rather than public admiration and esteem. He was one of a circle who laboured thousands of hours for charitable objects and institutions which administer to the sick and helpless, blind and infirm, and whatever he took in hand, be there few or many to assist, he worked and plodded. And when he was at his post his comrades always knew that what he did would bear the strictest scrutiny and be faithfully done. Grand Master His work alone in Oddfellowship is certainly a great achievement for any one man. Fifty-two years a member of the Tree of Life committee, thirty years assistant secretary and sick steward, past Provincial Grand Master for forty-two years (and this office was no sinecure in this case), lecture
master and regular attendant and assistant at the quarterly lecture for over forty years, promoter and trustee of the juvenile lodge throughout its career (which he held until his demise), founder and constant attendant of the Loyal Good Intent Lodge. As one of a voluntary committee in 1869 a house-to-house collection was instituted and resulted in over £67 being handed over to the Bradford Eye and Ear Hospital. This and other efforts were made before any medical charities were in existence in Shipley. One could conclude that these engagements along with his daily work would have consumed his spare time but that is not so, as outside Oddfellowship he devoted over twenty years to building up the interests of the Shipley Gala Committee and served as president of that body in 1894 and before and after that date it will scarcely be disputed that he counted up more money at the
takings at the gala for hospital work than any other man. Others did their work in shifts of two to three hours each but he went on duty at one o’clock and came off at the close of the gala, striking his last match to see if any of the charity money had been left on the floor of the finance tent. Cheerfulness Whoever was missing at his post did not matter; the committee always knew that James Dibb could be relied on to do the utmost of his duty with cheerfulness. Thus ends a career which will be missed for its constancy and quiet humour, cheerful and helpful counsel and whose deeds will be a fragrant memory to those he left behind. May his example be an inspiration to those who follow.
“Others did their work in shifts of two to three hours each but he went on duty at one o’clock and came off at the close of the gala, striking his last match to see if any of the charity money had been left on the floor of the finance tent.”
Passing of an unassuming Shipley benefactor
Grateful for the bond that ties us all together
A number of wounded heroes, in solemn conclave assembled, desired to show some appreciation of the treatment they have received at the hands of the matron and staff of the Salt Auxiliary War Hospital and the following literary effusion is the result of their cogitation: “Lucky dog! Been marked for Saltaire!” The scene is the interior of St Luke’s Hospital, Bradford, and the speaker a bed- ridden warrior and the fortunate canine, myself. One legged When a patient has become convalescent and is ‘marked out’ he feels some anxiety as to his next resting place and it seemed to me at St Luke’s that if the patients were allowed to choose, something like a thousand more cots would be needed in Salt’s Auxiliary Hospital. Two ‘lucky dogs’ in addition to myself seated themselves behind a Bradford Motor Volunteer driver and we are whirled smoothly around through the suburbs to our destination. My companions are a one-legged and cheerful hero of the Somme and a Military Medallist from Vimy, with a bullet-riddled arm. We are met at the hospital entrance by matron and sister. To these ladies we take an instant liking. Matron is a lady with striking grey eyes in which an unmistakable flash of humour hovers and sister is also grey-eyed with a manner eloquent of gentle concern for us. To soldiers accustomed for several years past to ‘roughing it’ in excelsis, the reception given by these ladies, to whom the men feel they are only going to be an additional burden, is reassuring. “Here they are,” says Matron pleasantly, “with their little bags and belongings. Go that way, boys.” Bearded elderly man We are conducted into a cosy room like a gentleman’s study, containing three comfortable beds. Over the fireplace, in which a fire burns brightly, hangs the photograph of a bearded, elderly man. Every line of his face depicts force of character and underneath, in a neat, firm hand, appears the signature, “Yours truly, Titus Salt.”
For the moment we can scarcely realise that this restful region is to be our home until we are considered ‘fit’ but as we sink into an easy chair by the fireside, we begin to feel quite at home. My mind reverts to a vision – more of a nightmare – of myself, only a few weeks ago, seated on a nail-studded box in a sour-aired dug-out over an unsympathetic brazier. Then, I had wondered whether it was in some previous earthly existence I had lolled in an easy chair by a fireside and grumbled because it was “too cloudy to venture out far.” Our satisfaction is real and complete when a cheery young nurse brings in tea on a tray and proceeds to set it out for us on a snow-white cloth. Reading, sleeping and eating The pleasant days are racing on and we endeavour to close our eyes for the time being to what the stormy future may have in store for us. When it is fine we wander abroad, returning here to sleep and eat, and when it is not fine we lounge about here, reading, sleeping and eating; and ye gods, such army luxuries as ‘bully beef’ and biscuits are banished from our daily lives. We are drawn from all corners of the British Isles – Ireland, Scotland, Wales and London – and we unanimously agree that if the inhabitants of Saltaire and Shipley are characteristic of the people of the West Riding, this part of Yorkshire must be a pleasant district to live in. Overflow of goodwill Why we deserve all the kindness showered upon us by everybody we cannot thoroughly grasp. Their sons, brothers and husbands are at the front doing exactly what we have done; their sacrifices are as great, and often greater than ours and yet there is an immense overflow of goodwill and tenderness towards us strangers. If, however, we are strangers, we wear the same uniform as their men-folk and in the past we have faced the shell- fire of the enemy side by side with their men. That may be the bond between us. These are the sentiments of Eighteen Grateful ‘Tommies.’
“We unanimously agree that if the inhabitants of Saltaire and Shipley are characteristic of the people of the West Riding, this part of Yorkshire must be a pleasant district to live in.” Hannah MitchellMatron Salts Hospital
“How long have they been married?” “About five years.” “Does she make him a good wife?” “No, but she made him an awfully good husband!”
Battle of the sexes
Task for boys with bikes
There is an opening for a few youths with cycles to sell programmes for the Whitsuntide Walk. The more programmes sold and the more the hospitals will benefit. Boy Scouts could make themselves useful in this way. Programmes may be obtained at 1 Atkinson St., on Monday morning at eight o’clock.
A very happy birthday party was arranged at the Saltaire Road Primitive Methodist Church on Wednesday afternoon. The members of the Women’s Own provided tea in honour of the 80th birthday of Mrs Elizabeth Crossley of 3 Murgatroyd Street. It is 65 years since Mrs Crossley joined this church and she is still a regular attendant at the services. Before the tea, an hour was spent singing old hymns and relating experiences of former days. It was an ideal birthday party and greatly enjoyed by all present. The Rev Henry Taylor presided and Mrs Taylor present to Mrs Crossley a token of the high esteem in which she is held by the members of the church.
Church member’s 80th birthday marked with hymns and memories
Read more about 25 May 1917 Read more about 25 May 1917 Read more about 25 May 1917