The events of August 1918
While there are signs that people were starting to believe the end of the war was in sight, any optimism on that score was balanced by the shortages and privations at home. Food rationing was biting and there was real concern that even with strict rationing, some staple goods would be hard to come by This led to discussions about how farming in particular could be helped - women were urged to join the land army, some people thought German prisoners of war should be used more, while others suggested that discharged soldiers could be trained for jobs in agriculture. So much pressure was there for everyone to work hard, that some felt it necessary to protest that schoolboys should not be expected to work both before and after school. While party politics re-appeared with parties starting to choose candidates for elections whenever they might return, the government was clearly concerned that people might start to think they could ease off on things like war savings schemes.They published a series of weekly advertisements suggesting ways people could make savings on things like boots & shoes, gas and laundry and to put the money saved into the war effort. Politically the main discussion was between those in the minority who were urging the government to take up Germany’s offers of negotiating a peace treaty and those who insisted that the only successful peace could come from the victorious allies imposing terms on their foe. Meanwhile, inevitably, despite paper shortages reducing the size of the newspaper to four pages, much of the space was taken up with the toll of dead and wounded at the front. The links here will take you to pages containing stories published exactly 100 years before. The headlines shown are only a taste of the stories that appear on that page.
2 August 1918
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Shipley Feast draws the crowds - Committee to help find work for ex soldiers - Barnes closes on 100 wickets
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Tram conductor helps catch thief   - Local girls on fruit-picking ‘holiday’   - Pupils start pig keeping
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Death of three-times decorated hero - Soldier poet, prahd to be a Yorkshireman - Weekly toll of dead and wounded
PAGE 1 PAGE 1 Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page Home Page Home Page Home Page
9 August 1918
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Differing views on Remembrance Day - Killed by a falling sign - Woman’s suicide in the canal
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Relief and warning for PoW’s families   - We need a war on poverty   - War has altered the meat on our plates
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Weathering a storm on the front line - He died facing the enemy - Musical send off for a bandsman
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