The events of February 1918
The main concern at home was the growing shortages of food and its increasing price. The introduction of local Food Control Committees to ensure a fair distribution was to inevitably lead to stricter controls and rationing Tea drinkers of Yorkshire were to be restricted to just one ounce of tea per head per week. The government eased the restrictions on trapping migratory birds, a butcher in Idle started to advertise horse meat and the newspaper published regular recipes for economic dishes that could take the place of more usual fare. The need to grow more food at home was again hammered home; schools were praised for their gardens, more land was seized to turn into allotments, grazing land was put under the plough and even golf courses were used to graze cattle. Two of our modern institutions were in the news. We read the first suggestion that what Idle needed was a working men’s club while ill health forced Sir James Roberts to sell the mill and village of Saltaire to new owners. There was more discussion about the role of women workers then in the future and the churches, which wielded considerable infuence over local affairs, were in the news because two influential figures, the vicars of Shipley and Eccleshill, announced they were leaving the district, close on the heels of the vicar of Windhill. Also leaving for pastures new was the editor of the Shipley Times & Express, marking the start of a series of changes on the newspaper. Although there was a steady toll of casualties and stories of medals being awarded, there was a slackening of detailed stories from the front and an increase in the mentions of soldiers being on leave. It was as if the war was catching its breath ready for another big campaign. One hopeful sign was the return of some prisoners of war, though almost all needed to spend time in hospital to recover from their ordeal. The links here will take you to pages containing stories published exactly 100 years before. The headlines shown are only a taste of the stories that appear on that page.
1 February 1918
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Sir James Roberts sells Saltaire - Weaving to help shell-shock victims - Praise for Shipley’s dedicated clerk
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Vicar rebuked for criticism of performers   - Tempers flare over pavilion for bowlers   - Fresh snow can enhance pancakes
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Killed minutes after planning a good time - Veteran camaigner taken prisoner - People at home should buck up
PAGE 1 PAGE 1 Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page Home Page Home Page Home Page ON THE MOVE: Rev Herklots, vicar of Shipley; Rev McKee, vicar of Eccleshill; and Rev Whincup, vicar of Windhill
8 February 1918
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Salts Mill changes go smoothly - Rationing will be fair to everyone - A cry is as helpful as a walk in the country
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - School gardens prove their worth   - The scope for women was never greater   - Village stoically dealing with the war
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Only food parcels kept PoWs alive - Soldier blames capitalism for the war - Yet more local casualties
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15 February 1918
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Frontiersmen return from East Africa - Dress rehearsal for rationing - Enthusiastic gardeners needed again
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Two local vicars moving to Leeds   - Beware privatisation of national assets   - Photo feature on local constabulary
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Prisoner of war moved to a better camp - Expensive meals in war-torn surroundings - Medal for Shipley sergeant
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