The events of January 1918
1918 started, by order of the King, with a day of prayer and while the suffering both of serving men and their families at home was recognised, the main message was that people had to ‘carry on.’ The dawing of a New Year saw the hardships at home increase Food shortages had become acute and  the sight of people queuing in the hope of buying the basics of life became commonplace. The government were taking increasing control of the supply of commodities like butter, margarine and sugar through the local Food Control Committees. Some believed that while they were being told to tighten their already tight belts a little more, others were able to carry on their privileged lives as before. And there was growing anger that a few businessmen were cashing in on the war while others were struggling to cope. While some companies were reporting that business was good, normally restrained teachers were considering joining the  Trades Council to try and improve their falling income. And we are reminded of the dangers faced daily in the wool trade when a local woolcomber died from anthrax. The war was costing the government millions of pounds each day and to boost the coffers they sent the ‘Nelson Tank’ around the country to sell yet more war bonds. Shipley and district contributed handsomly to the £4m+ raised when the  tank came to Bradford (calculated to be worth more than £200m today). News from the trenches included the usual toll of casualties and reports of the heroism of medal winners. There were also descriptions of Christmas and New Year at the  Front and a higher than usual number of  reports of men being home on a brief leave. The links here will take you to pages containing stories published exactly 100 years before. The headlines shown are only a taste of the stories that appear on that page.
4 January 1918
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- No need to queue for food - Anthrax kills 30-year-old woolcomber - Pastor’s comforting verses
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Vicar’s barbed farewell message   - Good news for shell-shock victims’ families   - Remembering the dead with pride
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Medals for local serving men - Shipley folk boost ‘Nelson’ fund - ‘One of the very best’ KIA
PAGE 1 PAGE 1 Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page Home Page Home Page Home Page
11 January 1918
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Food shortages starting to bite - Public generosity provides for the wounded - Preparing for life after the vicar
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Fined for swearing at ex-boss   - Churches support King’s day of prayer   - Idle CC sign Somerset veteran
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- An enjoyable Christmas in Flanders - They’ve given me a medal - Local hero on leave
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18 January 1918
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- Shipley must keep investing in the war - Teachers turn to Trades Council over pay - Important mills taken over
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  - Council buy land for working-class houses   - Shipley man chosen as MP candidate   - Inquiry into death of 8-year-old girl
- Looking back at Baildon at the time of the Crimea War
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- Doing the washing on New Year’s Eve - Soldiers carry pal to his grave - Wouded soldier loses an eye
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