The events of November 1918
November 1918 - Armistice! Peace. Time to celebrate for those who had survived the war to end all wars while searching for a suitable way to commemorate those who had made the ultimate sacrifice to win the peace. But there was a cloud over the peace. The second wave of the Spanish flu pandemic had arrived and people whose resistance was lowered by years of war were dying in huge numbers. Up to 100 million died world wide and locally the paper was filled with stories of people succumbing so that doctors,  undertakers and grave diggers could hardly cope. Among the casualties from the forces, still being reported, there is a special irony about those who had survived the carnage at the front only to be taken by influenza. Peace did mean the start of men returning home whether from the trenches or from prisoner of war camps and the newspaper was ready to tell their stories. Much of the discussion at election rallys was about what kind of society should now be built and one of the biggest changes was clear for all to see in an early local election where women would not only get the vote for the first time but one of the three candidates was a woman. And another was a Co-operator, linked to the still young Independant Labour Party. The links here will take you to pages containing stories published exactly 100 years before. The headlines shown are only a taste of the stories that appear on that page.
1 November 1918
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Mystery of woman drowned in canal - Free speech and the prince of pacifism - Family in railway crossing accident
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Price of milk fixed at 8d per quart   - Tea dealer’s suicide in the kitchen   - Boozers welcome to talk on drink
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Family bury their third son - KIA four days after re-joining regiment - Soldier wounded for the fourth time
PAGE 1 PAGE 1 Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page Shipley Times & Express base page Home Page Home Page Home Page
8 November 1918
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Deadly Spanish flu hits Shipley & district
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  - Social matters will be paramount post war   - Women’s football not welcome in 1881   - Window cleaner falls to his death
- Cllr’s welcome postcard from ‘dead’ son - Funeral for girl whose fiance was KIA - Shot for refusing to remove his medals
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Three and a half years as a PoW
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- Thoughts on entering a liberated town - Courage and skill rewarded - Men returning from war will need help
15 November 1918
- Windhill vicar writes from the Front Line - Letters home from “Eccleshill Road” - Serving men condemn striking miners
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- Armistice celebrations in the district - Women’s agenda and a ‘political wife’ - Teenage girl’s leg crushed
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
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  - Doctors and undertakers under flu pressure   - Bride dies days before her wedding   - Promising musician succumbs to flu
- Killed after just two days in the trenches - Civilian distress shames ‘shirkers’ at home - POWs give the view from the other side
- Soldiers survive the war but die from flu - Money still needed to unwind the war - Gave blood to save a dying comrade
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The PoWs who will be coming home